Spring Drowsiness

Recently, my wife and I were talking about how lately we’ve been feeling extra drowsy and lethargic, and she reminded me of a famous Chinese poem from the Tang Dynasty that is often quoted in Japanese culture as a figure of speech: 春眠暁を覚えず shunmin akatsuki wo oboezu This phrase can be loosely translated as “whileContinue reading “Spring Drowsiness”

Even Cherry Blossoms Get Old

Recently, I found this post on Twitter: The sakura sure have lasted a long time this year😬🌸 there comes a timeeven in blossoming Kyoto…sick of it或時は花の都にも倦にけり Kobayashi Issa (小林 一茶), 1795.Translation by David G. Lanoue.#Kyoto #Sakura #Japan #Chionin #小林一茶 #cherryblossom #知恩院 pic.twitter.com/sOjHZntnb5 — Adventures in Kyoto (@KyotoDailyPhoto) April 14, 2019 The haiku in question, writtenContinue reading “Even Cherry Blossoms Get Old”

Gone Before You Know It

Now that the miserable long winter here in the Pacific Northwest is becoming a faded memory (not to mention unusually persistent this year), Spring is finally here!  At times like these I love to go back and re-read poems from the famous Japanese anthology, the Hyakunin Isshu. In particular, one of my favorite is thisContinue reading “Gone Before You Know It”

Spring Fever

Warm weather has finally arrived! I wanted to post an old poem from my other blog here to celebrate: 久方の Hisakata no 光のどけき hikari no dokeki 春の日に haru no hi ni しづ心なく shizu gokoro naku 花のちるらむ hana no chiruran Porter’s translation is: THE spring has come, and once again The sun shines in the sky; So gentlyContinue reading “Spring Fever”